Omnesia once had a gig at the now-defunct Blakes on Telegraph in Berkeley where singer Medella Kingston appeared on stage and swiftly stunned both her audience and bandmate.

A tall woman with an alluring presence, Kingston toyed with her femininity that night in secret; she tucked her hair into the back of a tuxedo, donned a fake soul patch, and produced an androgynous act that, according to her bandmate Matthias Miller, managed to arouse the entire gender spectrum within the venue.

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From the East Bay Express; read the full story here.

Uptown Oakland's New Parish, a venue with a small stage in a tall room lined with indoor balconies to allow audience members to peer down on the performer below, was awash with coupled bodies collected to hear a man touring behind an album he crafted solely about his inability for romance.

Moses Sumney's Aromanticism is lush with dissipating orchestral arrangements and lonely guitar chords kept in time by minimalistic rhythm. His defining feature is his voice, armed with choral range and suited with a controlled rasp akin to a muted trumpeter. The only knock against him is his record barely squeaks past 37 minutes in length.

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From PopMatters; read the full story here.

Blessed be the bang-bang.

An event like South by Southwest in Texas this week may cheapen the effect of a bang-bang, wherein you hit two concerts back to back in one night, but it's a live music whirlwind that promotes further consumption and customization. It eschews concert bookers to allow for the creation of your own bill -- you get to be a god, and in this case, it's the kind of god that likes glossy pop rock and Appalachian harmonies both on the same night.

Last Saturday evening in San Francisco, two utterly unrelated bands hit stages about a mile apart from each other. Even though it was akin to an iPod on shuffle, jumping from the upbeat tropical guitars of the Aces to Darlingside's stripped-down folk was surprisingly complimentary.

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From PopMatters; read the full story here.